The Criminalisation of Cybercrime: Connected Dots and Blind Spots in the Development of Legal Instruments

Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash Building on her 15-year research on cybercrime, Dr. Audrey Guinchard, Senior Lecturer at the Essex Law School, gave a presentation on the criminalisation of cybercrime at the 2022 Society of Legal Scholars (SLS) Conference, held on 6-9 September at King's College London. In her paper, Dr. Guinchard explained that … Continue reading The Criminalisation of Cybercrime: Connected Dots and Blind Spots in the Development of Legal Instruments

The Co-evolution of Diversity in Property and Economic Development: Evolutionary Economics and the Vertical Dimension (Part 2)

Image via Shutterstock By Professor Ting Xu, Essex Law School Having laid out the horizontal dimensions of diversity in property in Part 1, I here offer a critique of the assumption in mainstream economics that all kinds of property institutions need to be or will be transformed into private property to promote economic development. I also reflect … Continue reading The Co-evolution of Diversity in Property and Economic Development: Evolutionary Economics and the Vertical Dimension (Part 2)

The Co-evolution of Diversity in Property and Economic Development: Key Concepts and the Horizontal Dimension (Part 1)

Image via Shutterstock By Professor Ting Xu, Essex Law School This blog post builds on the ‘Institutions, Economic Development, and China’s Development Policy for Escaping Poverty’ piece and comprises two parts dealing with the key concepts (Part 1) and mechanisms (Part 2) for evaluating the co-evolution of diversity in property and economic development. I argue that diversity in … Continue reading The Co-evolution of Diversity in Property and Economic Development: Key Concepts and the Horizontal Dimension (Part 1)

Mental Capacity Law in Contract and Property Matters

Image via Shutterstock By Jaime Lindsey and Benjamin O’Connell Mental capacity law could impact all of us at some point in our lives. When a person’s decision-making capacity becomes impaired, it can lead to a best interests decision being taken on their behalf under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. A best interests decision could be … Continue reading Mental Capacity Law in Contract and Property Matters

Freedom and Proportionality: A Workshop

Image via Shutterstock We are delighted to announce the details of a fascinating workshop taking place on 29-30 August 2022 in Molyvos, Greece. This international workshop aims to explore the relationship between freedom and proportionality, bringing together human rights law doctrine and philosophical theorising. It will do so by pursuing two main themes: Is there … Continue reading Freedom and Proportionality: A Workshop

Mediating Conflict Between Families and Doctors

Image via Shutterstock Jaime Lindsey and Margaret Doyle, University of Essex, School of Law Fundamental disagreements between healthcare professionals and family members about the life and death of loved ones are, thankfully, relatively rare. It is even rarer for those disagreements to be resolved through the courts. The Archie Battersbee case has, however, brought this … Continue reading Mediating Conflict Between Families and Doctors

Cuts to Legal Aid and Access to Justice: The View from Family Courts

Image via Shutterstock By Dr. Konstantinos Kalliris, School of Law, University of Essex Legal aid, as we know it today, is a relatively recent institutional development, but the concept is old. From the Court of Requests in Tudor and early Stuart times to the pro bono advice offered by the Poor Man’s Lawyers Movement, the … Continue reading Cuts to Legal Aid and Access to Justice: The View from Family Courts

Rethinking International Law from Amazonian Onto-epistemologies: the Kukama People and the Amazonian Waterway Project

Image via Shutterstock Cristina Blanco, PhD candidate at the School of Law, University of Essex, was awarded the PhD Fieldwork Grant 2021-22 by the Socio-Legal Studies Association (SLSA). Cristina’s research focuses on the interactions between Amazonian onto-epistemologies, international law (IL) and human rights in the context of an investment project. In the Amazonian rivers, water … Continue reading Rethinking International Law from Amazonian Onto-epistemologies: the Kukama People and the Amazonian Waterway Project

New Legal Protections for the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict

Image via Shutterstock By Professor Karen Hulme (School of Law, University of Essex) and Elizabeth B. Hessami (Johns Hopkins University) Nature and conservation are inevitably harmed during armed conflict. The laws of armed conflict do provide some measure of legal protection for nature, but these rules are limited and vague. The recent adoption by the … Continue reading New Legal Protections for the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict

The New Harmful Communications Offence and the Online Safety Bill

Photo by Gilles Lambert By Prof. Lorna Woods and Dr. Alexandros Antoniou, University of Essex, School of Law There has been much discussion about the threshold at which the new offence in cl 151 of the Online Safety Bill (OSB) might bite. We demonstrate here that the threshold is, as it is intended to be, … Continue reading The New Harmful Communications Offence and the Online Safety Bill