Cuts to Legal Aid and Access to Justice: The View from Family Courts

Image via Shutterstock By Dr. Konstantinos Kalliris, School of Law, University of Essex Legal aid, as we know it today, is a relatively recent institutional development, but the concept is old. From the Court of Requests in Tudor and early Stuart times to the pro bono advice offered by the Poor Man’s Lawyers Movement, the … Continue reading Cuts to Legal Aid and Access to Justice: The View from Family Courts

Rethinking International Law from Amazonian Onto-epistemologies: the Kukama People and the Amazonian Waterway Project

Image via Shutterstock Cristina Blanco, PhD candidate at the School of Law, University of Essex, was awarded the PhD Fieldwork Grant 2021-22 by the Socio-Legal Studies Association (SLSA). Cristina’s research focuses on the interactions between Amazonian onto-epistemologies, international law (IL) and human rights in the context of an investment project. In the Amazonian rivers, water … Continue reading Rethinking International Law from Amazonian Onto-epistemologies: the Kukama People and the Amazonian Waterway Project

New Legal Protections for the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict

Image via Shutterstock By Professor Karen Hulme (School of Law, University of Essex) and Elizabeth B. Hessami (Johns Hopkins University) Nature and conservation are inevitably harmed during armed conflict. The laws of armed conflict do provide some measure of legal protection for nature, but these rules are limited and vague. The recent adoption by the … Continue reading New Legal Protections for the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict

The New Harmful Communications Offence and the Online Safety Bill

Photo by Gilles Lambert By Prof. Lorna Woods and Dr. Alexandros Antoniou, University of Essex, School of Law There has been much discussion about the threshold at which the new offence in cl 151 of the Online Safety Bill (OSB) might bite. We demonstrate here that the threshold is, as it is intended to be, … Continue reading The New Harmful Communications Offence and the Online Safety Bill

Our 2022 Essex Law Research Blog Prizes

Photo by Alejandro Pérez The results for the Essex Law Research (ELR) Blog Prizes are in and the Law School's Research Visibility Team is delighted to announce the winners for 2021-22. This academic year, the ELR Blog published several pieces highlighting colleagues' outstanding research and celebrating their funding successes. Thank you to all our contributors … Continue reading Our 2022 Essex Law Research Blog Prizes

Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World: a Conversation

Image via Shutterstock Earlier this year, in March 2022, the Law School's Public Law Cluster held a fascinating meeting to discuss Prof. Paul Daly’s book Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World, published by Oxford University Press. Prof. Daly (Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa) talked about the fresh framework his book offers for … Continue reading Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World: a Conversation

A Human Rights Case for the Proportionality Assessment of Evictions in the Private Rental Sector

Image via Shutterstock By Dr. Koldo Casla, Lecturer in Law and the Director of the Human Rights Centre Clinic In the 2008 case of McCann v UK, which concerned the eviction of a family renting a house from a local authority in England, the European Court of Human Rights established that: “(T)he loss of one’s … Continue reading A Human Rights Case for the Proportionality Assessment of Evictions in the Private Rental Sector

Institutions, Economic Development, and China’s Development Policy for Escaping Poverty

The Nanpu Bridge, Shanghai (image via Shutterstock) By Professor Ting Xu (School of Law, University of Essex) I recently have had opportunities to reread the works of Professors Erik Reinert and Peer Vries and to reflect on my previous work on the relationship between institutions, economic development, and China’s development policy for escaping poverty. Professors … Continue reading Institutions, Economic Development, and China’s Development Policy for Escaping Poverty

What We Owe Critical Race Theorists: Part 2

Image via Unsplash By Dr. Tara Van Ho, Senior Lecturer, School of Law This is the second in a set of blog posts in which I discuss the lessons I learned in writing an article that uses a methodology from Critical Race Theory (CRT)—Bennett Capers’ “Reading Black” method—to examine modern investment law scholarship. The article … Continue reading What We Owe Critical Race Theorists: Part 2

What We Owe Critical Race Theorists: Part 1

Image via Unsplash By Dr. Tara Van Ho, Senior Lecturer, School of Law My latest publication is now out in the Journal of World Investment & Trade. In it, I use a methodology from Critical Race Theory (CRT)—Bennett Capers’ “Reading Black” method—to examine how modern investment law scholarship continues to embed and evidence historical narratives … Continue reading What We Owe Critical Race Theorists: Part 1