The Ecology of War and Peace: Marginalising Slow and Structural Violence in International Law

Photo by Sergio Torres Dr. Eliana Cusato, who is currently appointed as a Marie Skłodowska-Curie postdoctoral fellow at the Amsterdam Center for International Law, authored a new book titled The Ecology of War and Peace: Marginalising Slow and Structural Violence in International Law. Her book was published by Cambridge University Press in September 2021. The … Continue reading The Ecology of War and Peace: Marginalising Slow and Structural Violence in International Law

Constitutional Pluralism and Loyal Opposition

Image by Udo Pohlmann Dr. Tom Flynn, Lecturer in Law at the University of Essex, has recently had an article published in the International Journal of Constitutional Law (I•CON) as part of a symposium on last year’s controversial PSPP judgment of the German Federal Constitutional Court (GFCC). In that judgment, the GFCC for the first … Continue reading Constitutional Pluralism and Loyal Opposition

Enhancing Cross-Border Access to Electronic Information in Criminal Proceedings: Towards a new E-Evidence legal framework in the EU

Photo by Christian Lue on Unsplash Dr Oriola Sallavaci, Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Essex In recent years cross-border exchange of electronic information has become increasingly important to enable criminal investigations and prosecutions. As I have discussed in depth in my study “Rethinking Criminal Justice in Cyberspace: The EU E-evidence framework as a new … Continue reading Enhancing Cross-Border Access to Electronic Information in Criminal Proceedings: Towards a new E-Evidence legal framework in the EU

“You Were Only Supposed to Blow the Bloody Doors Off!”: Schrems II and External Transfers of Personal Data

Photo by Joshua Sortino Prof. Lorna Woods, Professor of Internet Law, University of Essex The Court of Justice today handed down the much anticipated ruling on the legality of standard contractual clauses (SCCs) as a mechanism to transfer personal data outside the European Union.  It forms part of Schrems’ campaign to challenge the ‘surveillance capitalism’ model on which … Continue reading “You Were Only Supposed to Blow the Bloody Doors Off!”: Schrems II and External Transfers of Personal Data

National Courts and the Enforcement of EU Law: The Pivotal Role of National Courts in the EU Legal Order

Image by David Mark Prof. Theodore Konstadinides, Professor of Law, University of Essex and Dr. Anastasia Karatzia, Lecturer in Law, University of Essex Prof. Theodore Konstadinides and Dr. Anastasia Karatzia acted as the UK national rapporteurs for the Fédération Internationale Pour Le Droit Européen (FIDE) Congress 2020, one of the most significant conferences on EU … Continue reading National Courts and the Enforcement of EU Law: The Pivotal Role of National Courts in the EU Legal Order

The German Constitutional Court’s Decision on PSPP: Between Mental Gymnastics and Common Sense

The Federal Constitutional Court Professor Theodore Konstadinides, School of Law, University of Essex The 5th of May 2020 will be remembered as a strange day for EU law and German constitutionalism. The German Constitutional Court upheld the constitutional complaints by several groups of individuals against the European Central Bank’s Public Sector Purchase Programme (PSPP). As explained in yesterday’s … Continue reading The German Constitutional Court’s Decision on PSPP: Between Mental Gymnastics and Common Sense

Whose Autonomy is it Anyway? Freedom of Contract, the Right to Work and the General Principles of EU Law

Dr Niall O’Connor, Lecturer in Law at the University of Essex, has authored an article exploring the significance, in the employment context, of freedom of contract as a fundamental right in article 16 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights (the Charter). For the first half of its existence, few could have foreseen that article … Continue reading Whose Autonomy is it Anyway? Freedom of Contract, the Right to Work and the General Principles of EU Law

Article 50 can be revoked: here’s what it means for Brexit

  Carlo Petrucci, Lecturer in Law, University of Essex *This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.   Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union can be divided into two parts. The first recognises the right of a member state to withdraw from the European Union. … Continue reading Article 50 can be revoked: here’s what it means for Brexit