The Coronavirus Act 2020 and Guidance Governing Social Relationships and Communication: An Orwellian Dystopia or a Protective Bubble?

Photo by Unsplash On 10 September 2020, Dr Samantha Davey, Lecturer in Law at the University of Essex, presented her paper entitled ‘The Coronavirus Act 2020 and Guidance Governing Social Relationships and Communication: An Orwellian Dystopia or a Protective Bubble?’ at the digital conference ‘Are Emergency Measures in Response to COVID-19 a Threat to Democracy? … Continue reading The Coronavirus Act 2020 and Guidance Governing Social Relationships and Communication: An Orwellian Dystopia or a Protective Bubble?

Spain’s New Minimum Income Scheme: A Victory and A Historic Failure

Photo by Daniel Prado Dr. Koldo Casla, Lecturer in Law, University of Essex This could be the most significant test of Spain’s fairness as a society. Starting last month, Spain has a minimum income scheme in place. Considering some of the international coverage, you would be forgiven for thinking it is some sort of universal basic income. It … Continue reading Spain’s New Minimum Income Scheme: A Victory and A Historic Failure

The Persistent and Pernicious Abuse of Insolvency Law: What’s Next after Virgin Atlantic?

Image by skeeze Dr. Eugenio Vaccari, Lecturer in Law, University of Essex England is no stranger to strategic or – at times – abusive use of insolvency provisions. In the early 2000s, a mechanism frequently used by debtors to retain the control of distressed companies at the expense of their creditors was pre-packaged administration. Following … Continue reading The Persistent and Pernicious Abuse of Insolvency Law: What’s Next after Virgin Atlantic?

The Crown Preference is Law (Again): Spinning the Clock Back to Early-2000s?

Image by Steve Buissinne Dr. Eugenio Vaccari, Lecturer in Law, University of Essex The Pari Passu Principle In corporate insolvency procedures, not all creditors are alike. This is despite the pari passu principle. The pari passu principle is often said to be a fundamental rule of any corporate insolvency law system. It holds that, when … Continue reading The Crown Preference is Law (Again): Spinning the Clock Back to Early-2000s?

The right to health must guide responses to COVID-19

Image by Raam Gottimukkala from Pixabay Judith Bueno de Mesquita, Co-Deputy Director of the Human Rights Centre, and Lecturer in International Human Rights Law, University of Essex, has co-authored a Comment on ‘The right to health must guide responses to COVID-19’with Dr Dainius Puras (UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health), Luisa Cabal, Allan … Continue reading The right to health must guide responses to COVID-19

Delayed Publication of Coronavirus Regulations and Legal Certainty – Concerns and Protections

Liverpool Street Station, London; photo by Ben Garratt Lee Marsons, PhD Candidate and Graduate Teaching Assistant, School of Law, University of Essex As part of my compilation of resources on Covid-19 for the UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI), I have been paying close attention to the publication of delegated legislation throughout this crisis. My main sources for … Continue reading Delayed Publication of Coronavirus Regulations and Legal Certainty – Concerns and Protections

The New Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020 – An Extraordinary Act for Extraordinary Times? A Quick Look at the Act’s Time-Restricted Measures

Image by Elliot Alderson Dr. Eugenio Vaccari, Lecturer in Law, University of Essex I. The Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020 On 25 June 2020, the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020 (‘the Act’) completed its progress in the Parliament and received Royal Assent. The Act has unanimously been hailed by the insolvency community as … Continue reading The New Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020 – An Extraordinary Act for Extraordinary Times? A Quick Look at the Act’s Time-Restricted Measures

LONDON LIVE sanctioned by Ofcom for broadcasting ‘potentially harmful’ interview on COVID-19

Image by Pexels Dr. Alexandros Antoniou, Lecturer in Media Law, University of Essex On 20 April 2020, the UK communications regulator Ofcom ruled that ESTV Ltd had breached its Broadcasting Code by airing an interview on the Coronavirus pandemic which risked causing “significant harm to viewers.” ESTV Ltd, the licensee, is the owner of the … Continue reading LONDON LIVE sanctioned by Ofcom for broadcasting ‘potentially harmful’ interview on COVID-19

The Changing Landscape of Lockdown Law

Image by Tumisu from Pixabay Dr Samantha Davey, Lecturer in Law, University of Essex The original position can be summarised by the Government’s mantra ‘stay home, save lives’ which became ingrained in the minds of the general public. We were permitted to leave the house for one of the following reasons only: daily exercise, medical … Continue reading The Changing Landscape of Lockdown Law

Knowing all of the law, all of the time – responding to COVID-19

Photo by Phil Botha Geoff Gilbert, Professor of International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, University of Essex  As Paul White has written on these pages, success in our COVID-19 response in humanitarian settings should not be measured in the ‘number of webinars, seminars, guidance and strategies’. Part of achieving success, though, is ensuring that humanitarian actors in the … Continue reading Knowing all of the law, all of the time – responding to COVID-19