Essex Law School academic joins the UN’s Harmony with Nature expert network

Photo by Noah Buscher Dr. Emily Jones, Senior Lecturer in the School of Law and Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex, became a member of the United Nations Expert Knowledge Network on Harmony with Nature. Dr. Jones offers below her input on the theme of Earth Jurisprudence. Earth Jurisprudence is a philosophy of law and … Continue reading Essex Law School academic joins the UN’s Harmony with Nature expert network

Social Rights and the Constitutional Moment Learning from Chile and International Experiences

Image by Patrick McDonald In the 1990s, Bruce Ackerman defined ‘constitutional moments’ as historic milestones of intense deliberation and change in a country’s politics, change that reflects in the country’s constitutional settlement. Since October 2019, Chile is going through its own constitutional moment, a moment that began with popular resistance against rising public transport fees … Continue reading Social Rights and the Constitutional Moment Learning from Chile and International Experiences

Nazanin Zaghari Ratcliffe: Her Journey to Freedom and the Lessons We Can Learn

Photo of Richard Ratcliffe at the candlelit vigil outside the Foreign Office on Friday 05 Nov. 2021, eleven days into his hunger strike, via Flickr. Professor Carla Ferstman is a lawyer and an activist. Before joining the School of Law in 2018, she directed REDRESS, an organization dedicated to helping torture survivors in all parts of the … Continue reading Nazanin Zaghari Ratcliffe: Her Journey to Freedom and the Lessons We Can Learn

‘No Longer a Member State of the Organisation’: The Expulsion of Russia from the Council of Europe and Articles 7 and 8 of the Statute

Council of Europe Committee of Ministers, via Flickr By Dr. Nikos Vogiatzis, University of Essex Introduction Russia is no longer a member state of the Council of Europe. On 16 March, the Committee of Ministers (CM) of the Council of Europe decided, “in the context of the procedure launched under Article 8 of the Statute of the Council … Continue reading ‘No Longer a Member State of the Organisation’: The Expulsion of Russia from the Council of Europe and Articles 7 and 8 of the Statute

Libel Trial against Investigative Journalist Concludes Before the High Court: A Landmark Test of the Public Interest Defence

Carole Cadwalladr speaks at TED2019: Bigger Than Us (April 15 - 19, 2019, Vancouver, BC, Canada) Photo: Marla Aufmuth via Flickr By Alexandros Antoniou, Lecturer in Media Law, University of Essex On 14 January 2022, a high-profile libel trial began before Mrs Justice Steyn at the Royal Courts of Justice in London. The British businessman … Continue reading Libel Trial against Investigative Journalist Concludes Before the High Court: A Landmark Test of the Public Interest Defence

Why the UK Government’s Plan to Overturn Court Decisions is a Bad Idea

Photo by Jordhan Madec By Maurice Sunkin, Theodore Konstadinides and Lee Marsons, School of Law, University of Essex The UK government is pursuing multiple legal reforms designed to rebalance “the relationship between the government, parliament and the courts” – a commitment made in the Conservative party’s 2019 election manifesto. Many of these reforms will affect how … Continue reading Why the UK Government’s Plan to Overturn Court Decisions is a Bad Idea

Incremental Development of a Legal Framework for Arbitration in Emerging Markets: A Case Study of Construction Arbitration in Nigeria

Photo by David Rotimi Dr. Fikayo Taiwo, Lecturer in Law at the University of Essex, has concluded her Ph.D. thesis titled ‘Incremental Development of a Legal Framework for Arbitration in Emerging Markets: A Case Study of Construction Arbitration in Nigeria’. The problem the thesis sought to investigate is the continued exportation of Africa-related disputes for arbitration … Continue reading Incremental Development of a Legal Framework for Arbitration in Emerging Markets: A Case Study of Construction Arbitration in Nigeria

Prescripted Living: Gender Stereotypes and Data-Based Surveillance in the UK Welfare State

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels From the post-war welfare state that inherently assumed married women would be supported by their husbands, to the 21st-century introduction of Universal Credit which financially disincentivises some women in cohabiting relations from working: the welfare benefits system in the UK has historically favoured individuals who conform to gender stereotypes. At the same time, … Continue reading Prescripted Living: Gender Stereotypes and Data-Based Surveillance in the UK Welfare State

Reparations Before The International Criminal Court: Who Are The Victims of Cultural Heritage Destructions and How Should Their Harm Be Addressed?

Source: Wikimedia Commons Ahmad al-Faqi al-Mahdi (Mr. Al Mahdi) was brought to the International Criminal Court to stand trial for his involvement in the destruction of several historical and religious sites in Timbuktu (Mali) during an armed conflict in 2012. This was the first time in the history of international criminal justice that an individual … Continue reading Reparations Before The International Criminal Court: Who Are The Victims of Cultural Heritage Destructions and How Should Their Harm Be Addressed?

Whose Perception of Justice? Real and Perceived Challenges to Military Investigations in Armed Conflict

Image by iStock States must investigate possible violations of international humanitarian law in armed conflict, and many of them use military procedures for all or part of the investigation process. Particular tensions can arise with regard to the perception of justice in the context of military judicial procedures, especially surrounding questions of independence and impartiality. … Continue reading Whose Perception of Justice? Real and Perceived Challenges to Military Investigations in Armed Conflict